SONGS FROM THE LATE MODEL HUMANS VAULT
THE LATE MODEL HUMANS ©
NOTE: The quality of the recording on some of these tracks is wanting, but there are some pretty good songs here that never made the final cut.
THAT TEXAS GIRL
This is the first take of That Texas Girl (currently available on the Late Model Human’s War of the Worlds CD,
as well as my solo CD
Real, Real Man). This is a much more raw take than the released version. A bit more angst
and passion on this one.
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A BOTTLE AND A GUN
When a reviewer recently said my songs "feature strong men in ‘High Noon’ situations" when describing the Real,
Real Man
album, I realized that is true for many of my songs such as this one. I’m thinking I should exploit that
aspect of my writing more, considering we live in a time of gutless pussies like George W Bush, Dick Cheney, and
their scared-of-their-own-shadows rightwing followers.
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MARY CAROLINE
A song about the beautiful Mary Caroline of Beaumont, Texas. Written while I was stuck at the Lincoln Tunnel
during the northeast blackout of August 2003.
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GOING DOWN FAST
At many times in my life I thought I was sinking fast and that there was no way out, particularly in December 1999
when I lived in Hoboken and would walk along the Hudson River at night and think about ending this wretched
existence. Then I’d listen to Billie Holiday and realize she found hope facing  much worse situations than I have.
The key is to
use that despondency to my advantage by writing or painting, and creating something worthwhile...
This song is a serious throat-shredder.  
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DADDY-O
Roughly: This is about getting paid back for doing wrong.
Then realizing the ultimate price is nothing to fear.
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THE MOON THE SHINES ABOVE
I always thought this song could be used to great effect in an advertisement for the New York Waterway. It’s about
finding love & taking the ferry ride from 38th & West Side in NYC to Weehawken, NJ. Something I’ve done many,
many times late at night getting home from a night in Manhattan.
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YOU BROUGHT A NEW KIND OF LOVE TO ME (FRANK SINATRA)
(Sammy Fain, Irving Kahal, and Pierre Norman)
This song was introduced by Maurice Chevalier in the 1930 movie 'The Big Pond'. But, as with many tunes that I
cover when I’m alone, I know this primarily by Frank Sinatra. I should put out a whole CD of Sinatra covers,
because unlike most people that do tributes to The Chairman., the songs I cover are generally ones that no one else
touches, like ‘
Lady Day’ and ‘Once Upon a Time’. CLICK HERE
DENISA
I find that the best songs are usually ones that roll out complete with very little actual work involved. This was
written in about a half hour on a sunny day in the spring of 2004 when I passed by the smiling face of the song’s
namesake. Pretty little thing!
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HE’S GONE
It’s been a long time since this was written, and since great people die prematurely every day, I’m really not sure
who I was talking about. But since the death of decent people is a daily occurrence, the song’s meaning will never
grow old.
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SPEAK OF THE DEVIL
An exercise in using a popular expression as a hook. I never heard anyone else use this expression as a song title.
When I originally wrote the bridge ( I could have been a farmer’s son / I could have been a rich girl’s man / I
could have had a hollow heart / the kind that you could understand ) I intended it only as a placeholder until the
words could be changed. But the off-the-wall nature of the words seemed so incongruous that I left them in.
CLICK HERE       
PICK UP THE GUN
Another from my High Noon canon of songs. The inspiration for this was the late, great Austin comedian & social
commentator Bill Hicks who did a routine about how the USA at the end of the 20th century had become a
country that arms the world and then fights them (such as Reagan’s friend & fellow freedom fighter Saddam
Hussein). Hicks compared it to a scene in the 1953 Western movie
Shane where Jack Palance throws a pistol at the
feet of an unarmed sheep herder and says “pick up the gun”. The man doesn’t want to fight, but Palance repeats his
demand - “pick up the gun”. As the man hesitantly lunges for the gun, Palance shoots him dead and then says, “You
all saw him. He had a gun”. A great analogy for the United States that Dwight D. Eisenhower warned against in his
farewell speech and that has since tragically come to pass. I used Clint Eastwood’s bar room bloodbath at the end of
The Unforgiven as the song's setting. CLICK HERE
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